Advertisements

Red Cross pop up op shop

14 May 2015  National Volunteer Week ………………………………………………………………………………………………………  The Fundamental Principles of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement are: The RMIT Bookshop on Little La Trobe St Melbourne has provided space for a Red Cross Op Shop at its entrance until the end of the month. …………………………………………………………………………………….......……     … [Read more...]

Threads for work

6 October  2014 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… People who experience disadvantage face many challenges, not the least of which is  finding suitable clothes to wear to an interview and during the early period of their employment.  The Working Wardrobe, an initiative being launched by Melbourne Poly techic’s Work Education Centre is a not for profit clothing store selling clothes suitable for a variety of workplace situations, with money raised being used to outfit disadvantaged students for the workplace.  Staff in the Work Education Centre will be able to give advice to people in understanding what type of clothing is suitable for … [Read more...]

Teachabout helping out

12 September 2013 Teachabout is an organisation set up by University of Melbourne students and ex-students to run school holiday programs for children in remote communities. It was established in 2010, with funding from the university and the Cybec Foundation charitable fund, by a group of students from Melbourne University’s Trinity College who had visited Minyerri in the Northern Territory the previous year. But the Teachabout people wanted the program to be more than just a boredom cure. So our program has a twist…We incorporate literacy and numeracy into fun, engaging activities with a fundamental commitment to community involvement and cultural activities. Our aim is to … [Read more...]

Life changing research (2): Alzheimer’s

CSIRO Media    |    30 April  2013 One step closer to a blood test for Alzheimer's Australian scientists are much closer to developing a screening test for the early detection of Alzheimer's disease. They identified blood-based biological markers that are associated with the build up of a toxic protein in the brain which occurs years before symptoms appear and irreversible brain damage has occurred. "Early detection is critical if we are to make any real difference in the battle against Alzheimer's, giving those at risk a much better chance of receiving treatment earlier, before it’s too late to do much about it," said Dr Samantha Burnham from CSIRO’s Preventative Health … [Read more...]

Life changing research (1): Epilepsy

University of Melbourne Newsroom    |    2 May 2013 World-first study predicts epilepsy seizures in humans A small device implanted in the brain has accurately predicted epilepsy seizures in humans in  a world-first study led by Professor Mark Cook, Chair of Medicine at the University of Melbourne and Director of Neurology at St Vincent’s Hospital. “Knowing when a seizure might happen could dramatically improve the quality of life and independence of people with epilepsy,” said Professor Cook, whose research was today published in the international medical journal, Lancet Neurology. Professor Cook and his team, with Professors Terry O’Brien and Sam Berkovic, … [Read more...]

The Scan Main Edition 4 April 2013

# 112 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Universities call for red tape to be cut A typical Australian university in 2011 spent almost a million dollars in meeting not even half of the reporting obligations of just one government department according a PhillipsKPA report, Review of Reporting Requirements for Universities, commissioned by the (then) Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE).   Universities together allocated around 66,000 staff days and $26 million in 2011 to meeting just 18 of 46 reporting requirements.  Universites Austalia chief Belinda Robinson … [Read more...]

Swarm of robots that could be a lifesaver

The Age    |     31 March 2013 The idea of robots swarming through the air like bees sounds almost apocalyptic but Dr Jan Carlo Barca, a founding member of the new Monash Swarm Robotics Laboratory in Melbourne, sees only the good. ''My idea was that one could use such a tool for saving lives and in industry,'' he said. At the moment he's working with a platoon of eight robots, teaching them to talk to one another, with a view to having them work together as a search and rescue team. The ultimate goal is to develop swarm robotics for use in the search for natural resources, exploration, the mapping of unknown environments, border patrol, surveillance and construction. Swarm … [Read more...]

A dud hormone gets to the heart of its value

The Age    |    8 November 2012 No longer will it be dismissed as "the dud hormone".   As of today a synthetic version of relaxin — a hormone first described in 1929 — is the key ingredient in a new class of medicine for acute heart failure that has been shown to improve symptoms and reduce deaths among sufferers.  Now retired, Professor Tregear, 71, began his relaxin research in Melbourne in 1975.  And while he knew the hormone was important, it took decades to prove it.  "There was always people asking 'why are we still working on relaxin, it doesn't do anything'," he said.  With patience and perseverance, Professor Tregear and his Howard Florey Institute colleagues set about … [Read more...]

Curtin student wins industry-run Crops Competition

30 September 2012 A Curtin University student has won the top prize in the 2012 Australian Universities Crops Competition, taking her agricultural knowledge out of the lecture theatre and applying it in the paddock. Third year agribusiness student Helen Duncan of Ravensthorpe was awarded the most successful individual student prize, while third year agribusiness student Andrew Reynolds of York achieved fourth place. The Crops Competition, run by Grain Growers Limited and held annually at Temora in New South Wales, involves students identifying crop type, crop health and weed species, and making management recommendations for each. … [Read more...]

Indigenous chefs in training for the top tables

The Australian   19 September 2012 When Ryan Battersby was manning a deep-fryer at his first job at McDonald's, the 18-year-old could not have imagined he would one day be mentored by the likes of Neil Perry. Ryan, from Armidale in NSW, is one of the first recruits to the National Indigenous Culinary Institute, which began training apprentice chefs this week.  The first trainees began a two-week skills course on 18 September at William Angliss Institute in Sydney. The institute was established by former Woolworths executive Bill Wavish, Sydney provodore and Fratelli Fresh founder Barry McDonald, and tourism industry veteran David Baffsky, with the support of a host of celebrity … [Read more...]